Number One, 1950, Jackson Pollock

Throughout the years it is long since been debated that Expressionism is slop on a canvas. To me there is no debate, it isn’t. As an Artist who became an Expressionist without trying or meaning to go into this genre of Art, I can say first hand that it does choose you, and only certain people can do it. Those who say infantile things like: “My five year old can paint better!” is a massive insult and slap in the face of the Art itself. It also shows such a pathetic lack of knowledge on Expressionism.

The above painting of Pollock is a good example of how hard this practice really is. It is deeply layered and there is a structure and a process behind it. Anyone who says it is messy, has the type of brain that cannot process it. What I mean is, everyone has neuron pathways that are individual to them. Some like chaotic things, others like straight lines and neatly styled Art. That is why their is Still Life, and Landscape Art for those who can only see things a certain way. So I am okay with people thinking differently. What I am not okay with is the attitude that because they say it is slop, the whole world must agree with them.

I feel this way because of something that happened recently. I get Art Advice from Rafi was Here on YouTube. He made a video, and someone in the comments went off on Expressionism saying that Pollock made money when he had no talent. I wrote a reply to him.

This kind of post is typical. I see it online in other places as well. Everyone just states an opinion, and they want it to be law.

Expressionism has taught me so much. One of the things I learned unbiased about it is that it is about letting go. If you can’t let go, the delicate practice of expressionism does not happen.

I also learned that there very much is a logical brain involved. Two parts of my brain turns on. It seems to activate both sides of what some call the right and left brain. I say this because technique does matter, composition, structure, all those things come to mind when I paint. Then there is the other side, that is truly where the magic takes place. In this special zone, letting go, expressing deepest desires and feelings inside of colors and shapes comes to life. For me, it is torture, just like many before me has said, because you want badly to express an emotion, and you have to use lines to express it.

So, I just let myself go as deeply as I can, and still stay tethered to some logic and structure, and balance the two. Truthfully without freedom and without giving myself room to be creative, the painting falls flat, and looks like I tried too hard.

So, you can see why I would find it insulting that people casually say that the art they do and like it superior to mine just because it is different. To me, all art is valuable, whether I like it nor not. I accept that my opinion on other types of art does not make me an expert. It is my personal opinion, period. I do not even bother to voice it usually because art is subjective, and I think people need the freedom to express what they see as art and that is fascinating. I can really appreciate art that is different, even if it does not strike a chord with me. I usually insult myself then and ask why I can’t see what others see when I look at something I do not understand.

The debate over expressionism being art needs to die.

It takes quite a bit of letting go, relaxing, and getting into a certain space to create an expressionist painting. If anyone thinks it’s easy, you are mistaken. It is a carefully crafted process. If I am not in the mood, I do not even bother going to the canvas. Either I get it right, or I don’t do it at all. It is an explosion of a strong emotion that needs to come out, and you get in, and get out before you ruin it.

It is an art form to be greatly appreciated. Like I said, I never sought out or planned to be an Expressionist. It’s what I found myself to be when I analyzed my work, and was forced to put a label on it. I am not ashamed of it, and will fight anyone who tries to diss it.

My piece: Speak, 2019.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s